Responding to the Master

“So you knew that I harvest where I did not plant and gather where I did not scatter?”

This line bothers me. Out of all the lines in the entire parable, this line bothers me. It makes the master sound like a crook. I’m not sure I would want to work for this guy either. But I suppose that’s the point, isn’t it? The master seems a bit off, but that doesn’t excuse the servant with one talent of silver for burying it.

The parable isn’t about the master, whether he stole other peoples’ crops, whether he was particularly honest. The parable is about the response of the servants. The first and the second servants, after receiving their silver or gold or whatever, took it and worked with it. Eventually, the master returns and they’ve made a nice return. The master entrusts them with more. The third servant, however, decides, “Hey, I don’t want to work for this guy,” so he takes his bucket of money and buries it.

Unlike the other servants who, despite some apparent illicit or odd activity of their masters, decide to make the best of it, this guy doesn’t. I imagine he probably complained about his master a lot, and generally was unpleasant to be around. He acts out of fear and mistrust of the master. He never asks the master to clarify what he’s doing, he just sees something and assumes the worst. Instead of taking the chance given to him by the master to do things his way, the “right” way, he just buries a bunch of metal in somebody’s yard.

Which servant are we?

God has bestowed many great gifts and abilities upon us. Sometimes, he acts in ways we don’t understand or that we really don’t like. But how do we respond to God when this happens? Do we stand firm in our faith, trusting that God knows what he’s doing? Or, do we start acting out of fear and mistrust, second-guessing God?

What about in our daily lives, and our daily struggles? When we are given what seems like an impossible schedule, with an excessive workload on top of it, how do we respond? Do we complain and moan and groan about it? Do we shut down and binge watch three seasons of “How I Met Your Mother?” Or, do we follow the example of the first two servants, and get to work? I’m not saying there’s no place for some leisure, but I’ve recently discovered how much I can get done when I’m not trying to stay current on 5 or 6 different TV shows, and how freeing it is.

This parable is telling us something pretty simple, really. Accept what you’re given, and do your best to make the most of it.

That is what we, as children of the light, are called to do.

That is how we make ourselves alert and soberly await the coming of the Lord.

That is how we remain in the Lord.

Remain in me as I remain in you, says the Lord. Whoever remains in me bears much fruit. 1 For when we remain with the Lord, we are coming to him with our labors and our burdens, and we can lay them at his feet. There, we will find rest… For [his] yoke is easy, and [his] burden light.2

Today’s Readings:
Thirty-third Sunday of Ordinary Time
Proverbs 31:10-13, 19-20, 30-31; Psalms 128:1-2, 3, 4-5; 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6; Matthew 25:14-30

First Saturday Devotions

One of the requests of Our Lady of Fatima was for Communions to be offered in reparation for the sins of the world on five consecutive first Saturdays of the month. This is still a very good devotion for many reasons, one because it directly helps repair the damage evil has done to the world, and two because it helps us to develop a healthy habit of attending Mass regularly in addition to Sundays.

It also helps promote regularly going to the sacrament of confession, since must be in a state of grace to receive Communion.

In order to complete the devotion, the Rosary should also be said, and we should spend about 15 minutes meditating on Christ or some other holy thing such as one of the mysteries of the rosary. This helps us learn to pray and meditate on Christ’s life regularly.

For more information, this page seems to be pretty good: http://www.themostholyrosary.com/appendix2.htm

You can also consult the Google.

Happy Easter!

Have a happy and blessed Easter season!

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I will try to get my current article series finished and posted soon. Things beyond my control have prevented me from finishing it thus far, but I’m pretty sure I can get it done this week. Thanks for your patience!

abbacchio brodettato

Abbacchio Brodettato is a Roman recipe for lamb. I made this the week after Easter. It was fantastic, and rather easy to cook. I got the recipe from about.com. In fact, I pretty much followed the recipe closely enough that it’s not really worth me rewriting it here. Instead, I present pictures of the process.

I also made some potatoes. They were pretty simple: quarter a bunch of potatoes, put them in a bowl. Put some Olive Oil in the bowl. Chop up some herbs (Rosemary, Thyme, anything savory really) and put them in too. After mixing it all together, put them in an aluminum foil packet and bake it for 20-30 minutes.

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Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas!

During the holidays, it’s easy to forget the point of the season. All the rushing around, buying of gifts and cooking of food consumes our time, and sometimes we never get a chance to slow down and enjoy this time. Try to slow down, spend time with your loved ones and remember why we all celebrate Christmas.